Genuine Fraud by E. Lockhart

 

genuine fraud

E. Lockhart is one of those authors I’ve always meant to read more of, having been blown away by the one and only book of hers that I’ve read, We Were Liars.  It’s taken me nearly two years to get to that next book and I really don’t know why I’ve waited so long.

Genuine Fraud is told in a rather disjointed way, with the narrative moving back and forth across the life of Jules, a young woman who is either trying to live a carefree life thanks to an unexpected inheritance or is on the run after her best friend goes missing.

It’s all quite complicated and it’s all very simple at the same time, meaning I never knew where I was in the story and found myself putting everything together as if it was a jigsaw.  Then, as each piece fell into place, I wanted to say “of course”, even though I had been nowhere near guessing the truth.

Fire on the Fens by Joy Ellis

 

Fire on the Fens Joy Ellis

By the time I get to book nine in a series, I am usually starting to flag.  Characters have become too familiar, storylines too predictable, and the “wow” factor I had when I picked up the first book has long since gone.

It’s why I’m always slightly anxious when I pick up a new book by a favourite author featuring a character I love.  I’m never sure if this will be a book that leaves me wanting more or leaves me cold.

I am pleased to say that the former applies when it comes to Fire on the Fens.  Once again, Joy Ellis has left me with a feeling of total satisfaction.  This is a great story, one with enough twists and turns to keep me guessing but not enough to stretch my credulity.

The Water Cure by Sophie Mackintosh

 

The Water Cure Sophie Mackintosh

On a small island, three daughters come to terms with the death of their father, known as The King, and the future where none of them – including their mother – can go to the mainland for supplies in case they become infected.

In this dystopian future, disease is everywhere and men are the carriers.  It is all the three girls – Lia, Grace and Sky – know and it means when two men and a boy wash up on the beach by their home they are full of fear, but also – for one of them – wonder.

To say the three are unhappy doesn’t really describe their situation.  They have known nothing else.  But they are unsatisfied.  Their life is a series of rituals to keep the sickness at bay and, as an outsider, it is strange to read and harder still to understand because Mackintosh doesn’t tell you what went before, how Lia, Grace and Sky ended up living in this remote place, and what they really remember of their life before.

Tuesday Intro: The Keeper of Lost Things by Ruth Hogan

Once again this week, I’m linking up again with Vicky at I’d Rather Be At The Beach who hosts a post every Tuesday for people to share the first chapter/paragraph of the book they are reading, or thinking of reading soon. This week I’m reading The Keeper of Lost Things by Ruth Hogan, a book which has sat on my shelf for what seems like forever and which I have heard such good things about I’m not sure why I’ve waited so long to pick it up. 

Whistle in the Dark by Emma Healey

Whistle in the Dark Emma HealeyElizabeth is Missing was one of my favourite books of recent years.  I thought it was a clever story with an interesting protagonist.  Something I hadn’t read before.  I had hoped for the same with Whistle In The Dark and, in many ways, I got that.

This is the story of Jen, mother to Lana, a fifteen year old who goes missing for four days only to turn up battered and bruised and refusing to tell anyone what happened to her.  Or at least Jen think’s Lana is refusing.  Lana herself says that she can’t remember anything.

Tuesday Intro: Whistle In the Dark by Emma Healey

Once again this week, I’m linking up again with Vicky at I’d Rather Be At The Beach who hosts a post every Tuesday for people to share the first chapter/paragraph of the book they are reading, or thinking of reading soon.  This week, I’m reading a book that came out a few weeks ago, Whistle in the Dark by Emma Healey, whose last book – Elizabeth is Missing  I really enjoyed.

My Husband’s Lies by Caroline England

My Husband's Lies by Caroline England

Where to start with My Husband’s Lies without giving anything away?  I’m not sure I can.  This book is so full of secrets and twists and turns spoilers are hard to avoid.  I’m going to try by just talking broad brushstrokes and seeing how that works.

It starts with a wedding, one which introduces you to four childhood friends – Nick (who’s wedding day it is), Will, Dan and Jen, all of whom, I think it’s fair to say, are slightly messed up.  Not one of them is completely happy and not one of them seems capable of being honest, with themselves or others.

So far, so like a lot of books out there.  What made this one stand out for me was how painful all their stories were and how heart-breaking.  I also liked how none went where I expected them to go.  For any of the four to be happy, people they loved would need to get hurt.  It was all very messy, just like life.

Having read England’s previous book, Beneath The Skin, the way the story was told (alternating chapters for each character) and the way it unfolded (it’s a slow build) was probably what I expected.  And this made me happy.  I had really enjoyed Beneath the Skin and I wasn’t disappointed here.  Liked it a lot!

About the book

Do you really know your friends?

On the afternoon of Nick and Lisa’s wedding, their close friend is found poised on a hotel window ledge, ready to jump.

As the shock hits their friendship group, they soon realise that none of them are being as honest with themselves – or with each other – as they think.

And there are secrets lurking that could destroy everything.
Tense, disturbing and clever, My Husband’s Lies is a breath-taking read, perfect for fans of Lucy Clarke and Erin Kelly.

Publisher: Avon
Publication date: 17th May 2018
Number of pages: 384
Rating: 5 out of 5
Genre: Genre fiction

Add to: Goodreads / Amazon UK / Amazon US

Note: I received a copy of this book in return for a fair and honest review.  All thoughts, feelings and opinions are my own.  

Tuesday Intro: My Husband’s Lies by Caroline England

Once again this week, I’m linking up again with Vicky at I’d Rather Be At The Beach who hosts a post every Tuesday for people to share the first chapter/paragraph of the book they are reading, or thinking of reading soon.

This week it’s My Husband’s Lies by Caroline England, whose last book (Beneath The Skin) I really enjoyed, which meant I really wanted to read this one.  This new book comes out next week so I’m behind on cracking the spine but am excited to finally get reading.

What is it about?

Cross Her Heart by Sarah Pinborough

cross her heart sarah pinboroughWhen Lisa finds a children’s stuffed toy outside her house, she knows something is wrong.  Very wrong.  Only one person could have left it, and they aren’t supposed to know where she is.  Panic rises – and builds even more when things that mean nothing to anyone but her keep happening.

It’s no wonder she is paranoid.  And no wonder she is driving her daughter – 16 year old Ava – crazy with her constant need to know where she is and what she is doing.  It’s also no wonder that Ava rebels, doing almost the opposite of what her mum asks her to do.

With this type of set-up, you know things aren’t going to go well for either Lisa or Ava.  The question is how is it all going to go pear-shaped and why.  Does it have something to do with Lisa’s secrets, or the ones her best friend Marilyn is hiding? Whose past is about to rear its ugly head?

Skin Deep by Liz Nugent

Skin Deep Liz NugentSkin Deep is one of those books with a killer opening, literally.  Cordelia wakes up hungover, wondering what to do with the dead body in her flat.  To try and give herself time to think, she heads out, looking for food, company and alcohol.  As her evening spirals, she starts to realise she has nowhere to turn, nowhere to go and she is out of options.

Where Liz Nugent goes from here is back to the beginning, to the small island off the coast of Ireland that Cordelia (not that she was Cordelia then) grew up on, to a family tragedy that changed her life, and then on through mistake after mistake and bad decision after bad decision till she ends up in a room on the French Riviera and a dead body.