In The Heat of the Moment by Viveca Sten (Sandhamn Murders, Book 5)

On the longest day of the year, the tiny island of Sandhamn is overrun by people who want to party.  They turn up on the ferry and dock their boats in the harbour and drink until they can’t drink anymore.  As the police patrol the area, their job is to contain the crowds and make sure the fun people are having doesn’t turn sinister.

Unfortunately, this time, they aren’t that successful and, in the early hours of the morning, the body of a teenager is discovered hidden on an isolated beach.  He’s been badly beaten.  More unfortunate still for the police, the island is full of potential suspects, not just the teenagers girlfriend and his best friend, both of whom were missing during the hours the murder took place and too drunk to remember what happened.

There were so many people on the island and, as they start to drift away, the police are in a race against time to get statements and try and figure out just who ended the young boys life.  Leading the case is one of the central characters, Thomas, a dogged and instinctive detective who is normally helped by his best friend Nora, though never in an official capacity.  Nora, though has problems of her own as her boyfriend’s daughter didn’t come home that night and no one knows where she is.  

Truth and Lies (DI Amy Winter #1) by Caroline Mitchell

Truth and Lies Caroline MitchellGrieving for her father, a respected Detective whose footsteps she’s followed, DI Amy Winter returns to work to a letter she could never have expected to receive.  It’s from a notorious serial killer, Lillian Grimes, who – along with her husband – was responsible for the death of numerous young girls offering to help her find the bodies of three victims whose graves are still unknown.

Normally, this is something Amy would jump at.  However, the letter contains more details than Amy can cope with, at least initially, because in it, Lillian claims to be Amy’s mother.  And that Amy isn’t Amy but Poppy.

The Guilty Dead by P J Tracy (Monkeewrench #9)

The Guilty Dead P J TracyA year after the death of his son, wealthy businessman Gregory Norwood is found dead in his study from what looks like a self-inflicted gunshot.

Despite all signs pointing to suicide, however, when Detectives Gino and Magozzi arrive at the scene, they aren’t so sure.  Everything is a little too perfect.  Plus, there’s the small fact of the blood they’ve found on the patio, blood which definitely doesn’t belong to Norwood.

So starts the latest wonderfully twist-y and turn-y outing for some of my favourite policemen and the Monkeewrench team, a group of hackers always skirting just on the right side of legal.

Perfect Silence by Helen Fields

A69ACB72-FE0F-463B-B2DF-DFFBBF740CAAOn a dark night on a lonely road to the West of Edinburgh, a young woman crawls along the road, clinging to life and the hope she’ll be saved by a passing stranger. A chilling scene to open a chilling book, one that made me squirm more than once as I read about a series of young women brutually murdered while two of my favourite detectives, DI Luc Callanach and DCI Ava Turner, struggled to make sense of it all and find the killer.

At the same time, homeless people across the city are being attacked. Their faces are being cut by an unknown assailant, taking advantage of their isolation  and addiction to Spice, a legal high that is pretty nasty. It’s a case that falls to Ava’s team too when links are drawn between the victims and makes for a lovely, complicated, plot.

I love this series, and have since picking up the first book, Perfect Remains, at my local library based purely on the cover (yes, I’m shallow, I know!). I just wish I could say more about the book but I can’t because to do so would mean to give away the twists and turns that make Fields’ books so good. You never quite no where you are going and where you are going to end up.

What I do know, is that – along the way – I’ll be treated to a gripping plot and well drawn characters that draw me into the book completely. And the characters just get better and more well rounded with each book. I love Luc and Ava’s relationship and could happily read about them for hours. If I got bored, there are plenty of other secondary characters to keep me interested, all just as real as the main characters, as well as the city of Edinburgh itself, which has thankfully never seemed quite as deadly when I’ve visited.

If you haven’t read this series, I can highly recommend it. If you have, hopefully you’ll enjoy this latest outing as much as I have.

Emma x

Publisher: Avon

Publication Date: 23 August, 2018

Number of Pages: 432

Genre: Crime, Police Procedural

Rating: 5 out of 5

Find on: Goodreads / Amazon UK / Amazon US

Note: I received a copy of this book in return for a fair and honest review. All thoughts, feelings and opinions are my own.

 

 

 

Weekly Update: 8th July 2018

Hi there and Happy Sunday.  Welcome to my first weekly update in what seems like forever, but in reality has been about a month.  Life just seems to keep getting away from me and – if I’m honest – I’ve been in a bit of a book blogging slump.  It’s been happening on and off since the Spring and I’m not sure I’m over it yet.

I thought it was because I felt swamped with review copies but they are all done now and I’m completely caught up so I’m actually reading books I’ve bought again – and it’s still made no difference.  With the school holidays almost upon us, I’ll see if the change of pace makes a difference.  If not, I may just take a break.  Oh the woes of being a book blogger 😉

Anyhow, on with my week and what I wrote / reviewed…

Murder in Slow Motion Rebecca Muddiman  image her watchful eye julie corbin

On Monday, I wrote a review of Her Watchful Eye by Julie Corbin, which I really enjoyed because it was full of unreliable characters and twists and turns.

On Tuesday, I introduced my latest read, Do Not Disturb by Claire Douglas, which is due out in August so not long to go for my review.

On Wednesday, I recapped on the books I’d read in June, the majority of which were 4+ star reviews so made me very happy.

On Friday, I reviewed Murder in Slow Motion by Rebecca Muddiman, a book set in / around my home town with great plot twists.

And that’s it for me – a short and sweet post. How was your week, reading and otherwise?

Emma x

This week, I’m linking in with Kimba at the Caffeinated Book Reviewer and her Sunday Post and with Katherine at Book Date for It’s Monday, What Are you Reading? Head over by clicking on their badges below to see what other bloggers have read, written about or just added to their shelves.

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Deadly Secrets by Robert Bryndza

Deadly Secret Robert BryndzaThere is something so nice about picking up a new book by a favourite author featuring a favourite character.  A sense of anticipation.  And also a sense of fear.  What, you wonder, if it’s no good?  Expectations are high, and it’s much easier to be let down as a result.

All of these apply to me and Deadly Secrets by Robert Bryndza.  His Erika Foster series is one of my favourites in recent years.  Each one has been interesting and exciting and has left me wanting more.  With every book, I wonder if he’ll manage to make me happy again.

I am very pleased to say (especially given my recent mixed reading experience) that I have not been disappointed at all with this, the sixth book in the series.  

Come and Find Me by Sarah Hilary

come and find meDI Marnie Rome is back and, for me, it couldn’t come a moment too soon as I was in need of a book in my favourite genre that left me feeling completely satisfied and a lot less grumpy that I been with recent reads.

I love Marnie because, whilst she’s go baggage, she’s also normal.  Her past bothers her, colours her present, but isn’t all consuming.  She still manages to have normal relationships with her partner and her team and she doesn’t go running off on her own every two seconds to prove something to herself.  

The Guilty Ones by Joy Ellis

The Guilty Ones Joy EllisWhen DI Jackman’s sister-in-law commits suicide, his family finds it hard to believe.  She was a loving wife and mother and didn’t seem to have any real cares in the world.

His partner, DI Marie Evans, finds it so hard to believe she becomes convinced not all is as it first appears.  It’s a belief that becomes a reality as first one then two more suicide victims are found, neither of which are quite what they seem.

It looks like someone has come up with a very clever way of committing murder – by getting his or her victims to do it themselves. It’s also a very clever idea of a book, one I enjoyed as I watched the police scramble to figure out just who was behind some rather vicious attacks on seemingly innocent people.

The Dark Lake by Sarah Bailey

The Dark Lake

When the body of a young and popular teacher turns up in the waters of Sonny Lake, the first detective called to the scene is Sergeant Gemma Woodstock, a local who not only knows the area but also the victim – Rosalind Ryan, at least in passing (they went to school together).

The connection, Gem insists, is slight.  The relationship between the two women non-existent.  So she stays on the case, along with her partner Felix. Unfortunately, Gem isn’t quite telling the truth; she has a history with Rosalind (Rose), holding a secret that might put the case in jeopardy.

Splinter in the Blood by Ashley Dyer

splinter in the blood

Splinter in the Blood is one of those books that opens with a scene that can’t help but hook you.  A police officer at the scene of a crime, the shooting of another officer, who – instead of calling it in – is destroying the evidence.

The victim is DCI Greg Carver. And the officer destroying the evidence his partner, Ruth Lake.  Why, it’s not clear – just as it’s not clear if Ruth is a dirty cop or a good one making bad decisions.

She seems good, I have to say, dogged and determined to figure out who shot Carver – and finish the case they were both already working on, the Thorn Killer, a serial killer loose on the streets of Liverpool. But there is always, all the way through the book (well until the climax) that nagging doubt.