Perfect Silence by Helen Fields

A69ACB72-FE0F-463B-B2DF-DFFBBF740CAAOn a dark night on a lonely road to the West of Edinburgh, a young woman crawls along the road, clinging to life and the hope she’ll be saved by a passing stranger. A chilling scene to open a chilling book, one that made me squirm more than once as I read about a series of young women brutually murdered while two of my favourite detectives, DI Luc Callanach and DCI Ava Turner, struggled to make sense of it all and find the killer.

At the same time, homeless people across the city are being attacked. Their faces are being cut by an unknown assailant, taking advantage of their isolation  and addiction to Spice, a legal high that is pretty nasty. It’s a case that falls to Ava’s team too when links are drawn between the victims and makes for a lovely, complicated, plot.

I love this series, and have since picking up the first book, Perfect Remains, at my local library based purely on the cover (yes, I’m shallow, I know!). I just wish I could say more about the book but I can’t because to do so would mean to give away the twists and turns that make Fields’ books so good. You never quite no where you are going and where you are going to end up.

What I do know, is that – along the way – I’ll be treated to a gripping plot and well drawn characters that draw me into the book completely. And the characters just get better and more well rounded with each book. I love Luc and Ava’s relationship and could happily read about them for hours. If I got bored, there are plenty of other secondary characters to keep me interested, all just as real as the main characters, as well as the city of Edinburgh itself, which has thankfully never seemed quite as deadly when I’ve visited.

If you haven’t read this series, I can highly recommend it. If you have, hopefully you’ll enjoy this latest outing as much as I have.

Emma x

Publisher: Avon

Publication Date: 23 August, 2018

Number of Pages: 432

Genre: Crime, Police Procedural

Rating: 5 out of 5

Find on: Goodreads / Amazon UK / Amazon US

Note: I received a copy of this book in return for a fair and honest review. All thoughts, feelings and opinions are my own.

 

 

 

Fire on the Fens by Joy Ellis

 

Fire on the Fens Joy Ellis

By the time I get to book nine in a series, I am usually starting to flag.  Characters have become too familiar, storylines too predictable, and the “wow” factor I had when I picked up the first book has long since gone.

It’s why I’m always slightly anxious when I pick up a new book by a favourite author featuring a character I love.  I’m never sure if this will be a book that leaves me wanting more or leaves me cold.

I am pleased to say that the former applies when it comes to Fire on the Fens.  Once again, Joy Ellis has left me with a feeling of total satisfaction.  This is a great story, one with enough twists and turns to keep me guessing but not enough to stretch my credulity.

Willnot by James Sallis

WillnotAfter my last unsuccessful experience with James Sallis (The Killer is Dying), I was slightly nervous picking up Willnot, especially as it was my choice for my first ever buddy read with Sarah over at Brainfluff. Thankfully, it looks like The Killer is Dying was a bit of a blip and, here, I got all the Sallis I could have hoped for – yay!

In his typical style, Sallis using words sparingly to paint a picture I found incredibly vivid.  I could picture the small town of Willnot and the people that lived there and I fell a little bit in love with the central character, Hale, a doctor come town ‘wise man’.  It’s his story that’s been told, but also the story of other people who live in Hale.  It’s all seems very simple on the surface, as life often is, but underneath there is plenty going on.

The Extraordinary Life of Sam Hell by Robert Dugoni

The extraordinary life of sam hellWhen I occasionally daydream about writing a book, The Extraordinary Life of Sam Hell is the type of book I dream about writing.  A book that creates incredibly memorable characters, that paints a picture of a life lived and a person I would like to get to know.

I probably will never get round to writing such a book but, thankfully, Robert Dugoni – better known to me for his Detective Tracy Crosswhite series – has so I don’t have to worry.

I apologies if I’m waxing a little lyrical here but I just really enjoyed this book.  There wasn’t a thing about it I didn’t (meaning you can probably guess the rating if you don’t have time to read the rest of my review).

Deadly Secrets by Robert Bryndza

Deadly Secret Robert BryndzaThere is something so nice about picking up a new book by a favourite author featuring a favourite character.  A sense of anticipation.  And also a sense of fear.  What, you wonder, if it’s no good?  Expectations are high, and it’s much easier to be let down as a result.

All of these apply to me and Deadly Secrets by Robert Bryndza.  His Erika Foster series is one of my favourites in recent years.  Each one has been interesting and exciting and has left me wanting more.  With every book, I wonder if he’ll manage to make me happy again.

I am very pleased to say (especially given my recent mixed reading experience) that I have not been disappointed at all with this, the sixth book in the series.  

Macbeth by Jo Nesbo

Macbeth Jo NesboIn a town rife with corruption, it’s hard to know who is good and who is bad.  Or, at least that is the case in Jo Nesbo’s Macbeth, which seems to sit permanently in the grey.

The city, somewhere in Scotland in the 1970’s is grey, overhung by smoke and smog. The settings seem to be mainly grey, with a lot of the action taking place at night or in the evening.  And the characters are grey, so many walking a fine line between what is right and wrong, it’s no wonder some of them start to fall.

In a way, it’s perfect Nesbo territory and why I love his books – there is a darkness there that draws you in and, even with characters that tend to chose the moral right versus the legal one, I can’t help but want them to succeed. 

The Good Liar by Catherine McKenzie

The Good LiarWhere to start with this review.  It’s been over a week since I finished The Good Liar and I am still thinking about it and still feeling in awe of Catherine McKenzie and her ability to take me outside of myself when I’m reading her books.

This is now the fifth book of hers I’ve read and the fifth one I’ve fallen in love with.  Why?  Her characters mainly.  They are so well written – so messily real – that I can’t help getting completely caught up in their lives.

Here, there is Cecily, a grieving widow the world has fallen in love with; Kate, a wife and a mother who is trying to outrun her past; and Franny, Kate’s given-up-for-adoption daughter, who has found her mother only to lose her again.

Come and Find Me by Sarah Hilary

come and find meDI Marnie Rome is back and, for me, it couldn’t come a moment too soon as I was in need of a book in my favourite genre that left me feeling completely satisfied and a lot less grumpy that I been with recent reads.

I love Marnie because, whilst she’s go baggage, she’s also normal.  Her past bothers her, colours her present, but isn’t all consuming.  She still manages to have normal relationships with her partner and her team and she doesn’t go running off on her own every two seconds to prove something to herself.  

Tuesday Intro: Willnot by James Sallis

Once again I’m linking up again with Vicky at I’d Rather Be At The Beach who hosts a post every Tuesday for people to share the first chapter/paragraph of the book they are reading, or thinking of reading soon.

This week, I’m planning on starting Willnot by James Sallis as part of a buddy read but also to – hopefully – regain my faith in one of my favourite authors after a not so great read of one of his books a few weeks ago.  Here’s what it’s about…

Bring Me Back by B. A. Paris

Bring me backFinn’s life seems pretty perfect.  He has money, a house in the country and a beautiful and caring fiancé.  Things probably couldn’t get much better, especially when you think that ten years previously he had been suspected of murdering his then-girlfriend, Layla, while they on vacation.

No body was found though and the evidence there was, was circumstantial.  Slowly, he rebuilt his life till he found himself where he was now – happy, or as happy as he thinks he can be, and waiting to get married.

Then he comes home to find his fiancé, Ellen, in a strange mood.  She’s found a small Russian doll on the wall outside their house.  A doll that looks remarkably like the one she always thought her sister, Layla, stole from her when they were children.  Yes, the same Layla that Finn was dating.  Do you get the feeling that things might be about to get complicated?