The Water Cure by Sophie Mackintosh

 

The Water Cure Sophie Mackintosh

On a small island, three daughters come to terms with the death of their father, known as The King, and the future where none of them – including their mother – can go to the mainland for supplies in case they become infected.

In this dystopian future, disease is everywhere and men are the carriers.  It is all the three girls – Lia, Grace and Sky – know and it means when two men and a boy wash up on the beach by their home they are full of fear, but also – for one of them – wonder.

To say the three are unhappy doesn’t really describe their situation.  They have known nothing else.  But they are unsatisfied.  Their life is a series of rituals to keep the sickness at bay and, as an outsider, it is strange to read and harder still to understand because Mackintosh doesn’t tell you what went before, how Lia, Grace and Sky ended up living in this remote place, and what they really remember of their life before.

Whistle in the Dark by Emma Healey

Whistle in the Dark Emma HealeyElizabeth is Missing was one of my favourite books of recent years.  I thought it was a clever story with an interesting protagonist.  Something I hadn’t read before.  I had hoped for the same with Whistle In The Dark and, in many ways, I got that.

This is the story of Jen, mother to Lana, a fifteen year old who goes missing for four days only to turn up battered and bruised and refusing to tell anyone what happened to her.  Or at least Jen think’s Lana is refusing.  Lana herself says that she can’t remember anything.

Tuesday Intro: Whistle In the Dark by Emma Healey

Once again this week, I’m linking up again with Vicky at I’d Rather Be At The Beach who hosts a post every Tuesday for people to share the first chapter/paragraph of the book they are reading, or thinking of reading soon.  This week, I’m reading a book that came out a few weeks ago, Whistle in the Dark by Emma Healey, whose last book – Elizabeth is Missing  I really enjoyed.

My Husband’s Lies by Caroline England

My Husband's Lies by Caroline England

Where to start with My Husband’s Lies without giving anything away?  I’m not sure I can.  This book is so full of secrets and twists and turns spoilers are hard to avoid.  I’m going to try by just talking broad brushstrokes and seeing how that works.

It starts with a wedding, one which introduces you to four childhood friends – Nick (who’s wedding day it is), Will, Dan and Jen, all of whom, I think it’s fair to say, are slightly messed up.  Not one of them is completely happy and not one of them seems capable of being honest, with themselves or others.

So far, so like a lot of books out there.  What made this one stand out for me was how painful all their stories were and how heart-breaking.  I also liked how none went where I expected them to go.  For any of the four to be happy, people they loved would need to get hurt.  It was all very messy, just like life.

Having read England’s previous book, Beneath The Skin, the way the story was told (alternating chapters for each character) and the way it unfolded (it’s a slow build) was probably what I expected.  And this made me happy.  I had really enjoyed Beneath the Skin and I wasn’t disappointed here.  Liked it a lot!

About the book

Do you really know your friends?

On the afternoon of Nick and Lisa’s wedding, their close friend is found poised on a hotel window ledge, ready to jump.

As the shock hits their friendship group, they soon realise that none of them are being as honest with themselves – or with each other – as they think.

And there are secrets lurking that could destroy everything.
Tense, disturbing and clever, My Husband’s Lies is a breath-taking read, perfect for fans of Lucy Clarke and Erin Kelly.

Publisher: Avon
Publication date: 17th May 2018
Number of pages: 384
Rating: 5 out of 5
Genre: Genre fiction

Add to: Goodreads / Amazon UK / Amazon US

Note: I received a copy of this book in return for a fair and honest review.  All thoughts, feelings and opinions are my own.  

Tuesday Intro: The Things We Learn When We’re Dead by Charlie Laidlaw

For the first time in a while,  I’m linking up again with Vicky at I’d Rather Be At The Beach who hosts a post every Tuesday for people to share the first chapter/paragraph of the book they are reading, or thinking of reading soon.

This week it’s The Things We Learn When We’re Dead by Charlie Laidlaw, who very kindly sent me a copy to read.  I have to say the cover was what first caught my eye, but it sounds good too.  Here’s what it’s about…

The Extraordinary Life of Sam Hell by Robert Dugoni

The extraordinary life of sam hellWhen I occasionally daydream about writing a book, The Extraordinary Life of Sam Hell is the type of book I dream about writing.  A book that creates incredibly memorable characters, that paints a picture of a life lived and a person I would like to get to know.

I probably will never get round to writing such a book but, thankfully, Robert Dugoni – better known to me for his Detective Tracy Crosswhite series – has so I don’t have to worry.

I apologies if I’m waxing a little lyrical here but I just really enjoyed this book.  There wasn’t a thing about it I didn’t (meaning you can probably guess the rating if you don’t have time to read the rest of my review).

The Half Sister by Catherine Chanter

The Half-Sister by Catherine ChanterCatherine Chanter’s The Well was one of those books I picked up at the library based purely on the cover and ended up really enjoying. Years later, the story and the characters have stayed with me – something that isn’t easy given the number of books I read.

Seeing Chanter’s new book on Net Galley then, it was an obvious choice to request it. I have to say, I expected great things. Maybe my expectations were too high, maybe it’s my current reading mood, but unfortunately, The Half Sister hasn’t had the same impact on me.

The Last of the Greenwoods by Clare Morrall

last of the greenwoodsWhen Zohra, a postwoman with a past that has derailed her life, is asked to deliver a letter to two brothers who time seems to have forgotten, she can’t help but be intrigued – especially when she finds out they live in a railway carriage (also lost in time).

Zohra has an interest in trains, is helping to restore a local station and train line, and an interest – it seems – in people who, just like her, have secrets.  And the Greenwoods, Johnny and Nick, have secrets, a whole lifetime of them.

Johnny and Nick bury everything in a shield of anger at each other, they always have, but it got worse when – forty odd years ago – their sister died and their mom fell apart.  Still only young, they were left to their own devices and to pick up the pieces.  They didn’t pick them up very well.   

The Language of Dying by Sarah Pinborough

The language of dyingThe Language of Dying is one of those books I saw at the library and picked up for he cover alone. Then I realised it was written by Sarah Pinborough, who I haven’t read but I know has written other books other bloggers have loved.  I had high hopes, hopes which were originally met – at least for the first half of the short book (it’s only 131 pages).

It starts with a woman – whose name we never get to know (or if we did, I missed it) – sitting by the bed of her dying father.  She is alone, thinking back over her life and how she has ended up where she is, and waiting for her brothers and sisters to arrive to say their final goodbyes.

I found this bit so well written and the language, whilst it might have been about dying, was beautiful.  The thoughts going through the woman’s head, her inner monologue as her family arrives and she thinks back on their childhood and move into adulthood and how, somewhere along the way, it all went wrong for them, completely drew me in.  I was convinced that I had found a perfect book for me.

Stacking the shelves: 21st October, 2017

STSsmallOnce again, I’m joining in with Tynga at Tynga’s Reviews and Marlene of Reading Reality for Stacking Shelves, where you share the real and virtual books you have added to your shelves in the last week.

So it had to happen – I fell off the NetGalley wagon!  Only for one book though and – in the way that my brain works – I have decided it doesn’t really count because it’s for a book that isn’t out till next April so there is plenty of time to read and review it (yes, I know, it sounds like an excuse but I think it’s a good one!).