Monthly update: November, 2017

Month in review

So this is it, the final countdown to Christmas is one day away – time to dig out the advent calendars and start shopping earnest!  I am officially getting excited (it helps that it has snowed here today, and I love snow).  I’m not sure what the season will do to my reading and blogging but I imagine for a lot of us it will start to slow down as we focus on other things.  November, though was a good reading month (bar a mini-slump half way through).  Here’s what I liked, loved and just weren’t for me this month…

Thieves on the Fens by Joy Ellis

Thieves on the fens

DI Nikki Galena is back and I couldn’t be happier as she is one of my favourite female detectives and the “on the Fens” series, one of my favourites too.

There are some many things to love, including that they all start with a bang, something to make you want to keep reading on.  Here, it’s a call to Nikki from a mysterious man speaking in thieves’ cant, an old fashioned secret code (think cockney rhyming slang).  People, he says are going to die – and he is going to be the one doing the killing.

It all seems linked to a series of burglaries that the team are already working on, though it’s not clear how or what this mysterious man’ (who they nickname Mad Tom) ultimate aim is, other than teach Nikki a lesson.  

Tuesday intro: The Weird Sisters by Eleanor Brown

Once again I’m linking up again with Diane at Bibliophile by the Sea who hosts a post every Tuesday for people to share the first chapter / paragraph of the book they are reading, or thinking of reading soon.

tuesdayI’m also joining in with Teaser Tuesday, hosted by The Purple Booker, where you share teasers from your current read. I read a lot of these posts over the course of an average Tuesday so thought it would be fun to join in here too.

This week, I’m reading one of my library books that has to go back this time round after numerous renewals, The Weird Sisters by Eleanor Brown. 

Weekly update: 27th November, 2017

Weekly update

Morning all and welcome to another weekly update post, though this one is being posted on a Monday rather than a Sunday. I’m a bit behind with my posting because I was away this week, visiting friends (which was lovely) and, thanks to a slight blogging slump last week, hadn’t gotten round to writing up my post in advance.  It was drafted though so I thought I would get it up anyway and check in with all you lovely people out there and see how you were doing…good, I hope?

Little Boy Blue by M. J. Arlidge

Little Boy BlueI had one word to say after finishing Little Boy Blue – “Wow!”  I’m a huge fan of the series staring Detective Helen Grace anyway but this, for me, has been the best book yet.

Why?  It started off with the murder of a recurring character in a pretty horrific way (not graphic in the blood and guts way but just in a way which must have been terrifying).

He’s someone Helen knows, though the rest of the team aren’t aware, and she does her best to keep it secret.  With a dogged reporter on her case, it’s not that easy though, and it sets her on edge – effecting her relationship with her team (a relationship that tends to be tense anyway as Helen is not the easiest person to work with).

Cleaning up the TBR

I first saw this post idea over on Fictionophile, who herself had seen it on Lost in a Story and thought it was a really good idea.  I know I’m not the only one who thought the same as I’ve been seeing it everywhere recently so I am glad to jump on the bandwagon.  Hopefully no one will mind 🙂

The idea is you take your Goodreads TBR list, sort by ascending date added, and look at the oldest five to ten items on your list.  If you haven’t read them by now, are you likely to? Why or why not?  If you want to keep them, make the case.

The oldest on my list comes from 2014 (I actually deleted my Goodreads account for a while and this is when I started back up again because I couldn’t think of a better way to keep track of books I wanted to read).

The Language of Dying by Sarah Pinborough

The language of dyingThe Language of Dying is one of those books I saw at the library and picked up for he cover alone. Then I realised it was written by Sarah Pinborough, who I haven’t read but I know has written other books other bloggers have loved.  I had high hopes, hopes which were originally met – at least for the first half of the short book (it’s only 131 pages).

It starts with a woman – whose name we never get to know (or if we did, I missed it) – sitting by the bed of her dying father.  She is alone, thinking back over her life and how she has ended up where she is, and waiting for her brothers and sisters to arrive to say their final goodbyes.

I found this bit so well written and the language, whilst it might have been about dying, was beautiful.  The thoughts going through the woman’s head, her inner monologue as her family arrives and she thinks back on their childhood and move into adulthood and how, somewhere along the way, it all went wrong for them, completely drew me in.  I was convinced that I had found a perfect book for me.

Weekly update: 19th November, 2017

Weekly update

Morning all and welcome to another Sunday post.  I hope you had a good week and weekend. I am not sure where my week went, though I didn’t get up to anything much.  I went running, electioneering and did some work on my management qualification and suddenly it was Friday night.  Still, I’m not complaining because I also don’t think I moaned once about anything I had to do, which is a nice place to be.

The one thing that definitely happened to me this week is I realised that Christmas is fast approaching and, no matter what I did, that wasn’t going to change.  Which means time to get organised and start buying presents.  I’ll be doing some of that today in-between shopping for my daughter’s Christmas parties outfit (yes, parties – she has a better social life than I do!).  Before I head out to do that though, here’s a round-up of what I did on the blog this week…

Stacking Shelves: 18th November, 2017

STSsmallOnce again, I’m joining in with Tynga at Tynga’s Reviews and Marlene of Reading Reality for Stacking Shelves, where you share the real and virtual books you have added to your shelves in the last week.

Over the last fee weeks, I have been working really hard to catch up on my reviews of ARCs, which I have finally done.  I have nothing overdue (yay!).  Which meant I felt perfectly justified in requested more books from Netgalley this week… 

The Foster Child by Jenny Blackhurst

The Foster ChildWhen Imogen and Dan decide to move back to her childhood home after the death of her mother, it is with the idea of starting a new life after a difficult year, one where Imogen found herself unemployed and suffering from a breakdown.

Unable to find work in London and maintain their lifestyle, a chance to move to a home already paid for seems like a good idea, as does taking a job at a local child protection agency (Imogen is a child psychologist).  If only Imogen could stop feeling full of dread.