Tuesday Intro: The Language of Dying by Sarah Pinborough

Once again I’m linking up again with Diane at Bibliophile by the Sea who hosts a post every Tuesday for people to share the first chapter / paragraph of the book they are reading, or thinking of reading soon.

tuesdayI’m also joining in with Teaser Tuesday, hosted by The Purple Booker, where you share teasers from your current read. I read a lot of these posts over the course of an average Tuesday so thought it would be fun to join in here too.

As you’ll know if you spend any time on my blog, I have a thing for covers and am often guilty of picking books for what they look like before I even know what they are about.  There is a bit of that here, with my latest pick, but more than that it was the title.  I just couldn’t resist as soon as I saw it on the library shelf….

The Real Guy Fawkes by Nick Holland

This is officially my favourite time of year.  First, you have Halloween.  Then, it’s Bonfire Night.  As a child, living in a small village, we would have a real community bonfire, with potatoes baking in the embers and a small – but perfectly formed – fireworks display.  I don’t know how many of these type of events exist anymore.  Our local bonfire is a huge affair, run by the local council and so many fireworks it makes your head spin.  There is no more baking potatoes – or kids wandering the streets asking for a “penny for the guy” (and how much does a penny get you nowadays?).

For all of this love of Bonfire Night though, I know very little about the man himself – no more than the legend that has grown up around him and the plot to blow up the Houses of Parliament.  Which is why I wanted to read The Real Guy Fawkes by NIck Holland, especially as I was promised the truth about the man behind the myth.

The Other Woman by Laura Wilson

the other womanSophie seems to have the perfect life.  A gorgeous house in Norfolk, where she and her family de-camped a few years earlier to escape the hustle and bustle of London, children who are excelling at school or about to head off to Oxbridge (after their year spent travelling, of course), a successful business, and a husband who loves her.

Or at least perfection is what she wants everyone who receives her annual round robin letter to think  She artfully airbrushes out anything that doesn’t quite fit with the world she has created.  It is pretty clear from pretty early on that, for Sophie, appearances matter – as do things.  She likes to shop and she likes to show off what she has.

And, in the grand scheme of things, especially if you compared her life to those of others, there probably isn’t much she can moan about.  Nobody is perfect, and neither are their lives, but hers is pretty close.  At least it is until one of her round robin letters is returned, defaced with words that send her spiralling – Leo (her husband), they say, is having an affair and is about to leave her. 

Stacking the shelves: 21st October, 2017

STSsmallOnce again, I’m joining in with Tynga at Tynga’s Reviews and Marlene of Reading Reality for Stacking Shelves, where you share the real and virtual books you have added to your shelves in the last week.

So it had to happen – I fell off the NetGalley wagon!  Only for one book though and – in the way that my brain works – I have decided it doesn’t really count because it’s for a book that isn’t out till next April so there is plenty of time to read and review it (yes, I know, it sounds like an excuse but I think it’s a good one!). 

Book blogger hop: Scary movies (at least in my world)…

Halloween EditionIt’s being a while since I took part in a book blogger hop but, today, the urge struck and – unlike the last few weeks – the question was one I could answer with more than one sentence (one sentence always seems like such a waste of a post).

The other nice thing about this week, after writing three reviews back to back, is that it’s not about books.  It’s about movies…

Off the book topic – What is your favourite scary movie?

So, when it comes to scary movies I have to say I am a bit of wimp.  I think I want to be scared – but, when it comes down to it, I don’t really.  I blame my parents (who doesn’t?), who let me watch scary movies as a child, thinking because they were old and in black and white they were harmless.  How wrong they were!

A Pocketful of Crows by Joanne M. Harris

a pocketful of crowsIn a time when superstition ruled the way people behaved, a brown-skinned, black-eyed, girl falls in love with the beautiful son of the local laird.

She is not the type of girl people fall in love with, not the type the local folk trust.  She is not like them, she is a traveller. She moves on the wind, with the animals, lives with nature.  She is completely free, or at least she is until she falls in love.

Then she becomes bound, changing her name, her ways, her future.  She trusts in the love she feels and, already in love with her myself, I prayed that that love wouldn’t be betrayed.

The course of true love never runs smooth though and this story is no exception.  The question is whether there will be a happy ending or if it will all end in tears? 

The Last Day of Emily Lindsey by Nic Joseph

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Nightmares are scary things for all of us (well, for me at least, so I’ll project that same response onto anyone reading this), no more so than for Steven, who has been having the same dream for as long as he can remember.  It’s one he can’t explain and can’t shake.  As he grows older, his dreams start to invade his waking hours, becoming visions he can’t control.

Growing up in the foster system, afraid his new parents would “send him back” if he told them how bad it was, he has managed to (mostly) successfully hide what was happening to him from those he loves and those he works with.  Work is especially important as he is a homicide detective – no one wants a crazy policeman do they?

Herbs by Judith Hann

Herbs Cover

The first thing I want to say about Herbs is how gorgeous it is – even as an ebook.  From the cover through the photos that are generously shared throughout the book – each one makes me want to grow herbs and then eat the food made with them.

To be fair, Hann was pushing on a bit of an open door as I have been trying for the last few years to do just what she is looking to help me achieve – a herb garden, one that I can use year round and comes back year on year.

So far, I haven’t been very successful, and my herb garden (now that the summer is over) consists of one surviving plant – sage (which seems to still be going strong).  That doesn’t meant that what I planted didn’t grow well this summer, they did, they just didn’t hang around.  Reading Herbs,  it looks like I’ve made a few rooky mistakes there (choice of soil being the biggest one), but there isn’t anything I can’t fix next year and nothing scary.

Weekly update: 15th October, 2017

Weekly update

Morning all and welcome to another Sunday – I hope you’ve had a good week. Mine was good, pretty relaxing.  And the sun shone, which was nice to see, even when the days were cold.  I’ve been trying to winterise the garden – taking advantage of the lack of rain – and am pretty much done.  I have maybe a day left so keep your fingers crossed for me that my luck continues!

Other than that, there hasn’t been much going on, which feels kind of nice.  I got a fair bit of reading done, stuck to my plan to not pick up any new books this week (avoiding NetGalley like the plague), and caught up a little on the reviews I was behind on.  I should be completely caught up by the end of next week if I can keep the reading rate up but we’ll see.

This meant last week I got three reviews posted…

It was nice to have three so different books as well.  Lie to Me by J. T. Ellison is a psychological thriller, so right up my usual reading street.  It was a good read, keeping me guessing right to the end as to just what was happening.  It had a bit of a sense of humour too, which you don’t normally find in this type of book, and I liked that.

The Flexible Vegetarian by Jo Pratt is a cookbook (probably obvious but I like to be clear), one that shows you how to make meatless meat with meat if needed to meet the needs of a variety of tastes.  It worked well in my house where I’m the sole veggie.  I made two recipes from it, one of which I can safely say was one of the best soups I have ever eaten – making the book a winner for me!

Queens of the Conquest by Alison Weir is the first of four books looking at the Queens of England / Britain.  This one focuses on medieval queens – a lot of whom (all?) seem to be called Matilda.  I found the fact that so many of them had the same name but other than that really enjoyed this book, which was well research, well written, and shed light on a group of women I knew very little about but whose actions helped shape my country.

And that was it post wise, other than sharing my most recent read in the Tuesday Intro: The Fall of Lisa Bellow by Susan Perabo.

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And that’s it for me this week.  How about you – how was your week, reading and otherwise?  Let me know, I’m nosey!

Emma x

This week, I’m linking in with Kimba at the Caffeinated Book Reviewer and her Sunday Post and with Katherine at Book Date for It’s Monday, What Are you Reading? Head over by clicking on their badges below to see what other bloggers have read, written about or just added to their shelves.

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