What I'm Reading This Week: 16th March, 2015

Morning All! Today, I’m actually glad it’s Monday because I’m off work. On the agenda? Not a lot. Lunch with a friend and lots of lounging around (I did briefly think of doing housework but then decided that was too much effort 😉). On the reading list for today, and the rest of the week are…

The Bees by Laline Paull, picked for my book club, this sounds fascinating if the author can pull it off.  image

Flora 717 is a sanitation worker, a member of the lowest caste in her orchard hive where work and sacrifice are the highest virtues and worship of the beloved Queen the only religion. But Flora is not like other bees. With circumstances threatening the hive’s survival, her curiosity is regarded as a dangerous flaw but her courage and strength are an asset. She is allowed to feed the newborns in the royal nursery and then to become a forager, flying alone and free to collect pollen. She also finds her way into the Queen’s inner sanctum, where she discovers mysteries about the hive that are both profound and ominous. But when Flora breaks the most sacred law of all—daring to challenge the Queen’s fertility—enemies abound, from the fearsome fertility police who enforce the strict social hierarchy to the high priestesses jealously wedded to power. Her deepest instincts to serve and sacrifice are now overshadowed by an even deeper desire, a fierce maternal love that will bring her into conflict with her conscience, her heart, her society—and lead her to unthinkable deeds.

Also planned is Dead Wake by Erik Larson, a review copy about the sinking of the Lusitania, of which I know nothing other than it happened on my birthday (day, not year). I haven’t read any non-fiction in a while and this one really appealed. image

On May 1, 1915, a luxury ocean liner as richly appointed as an English country house sailed out of New York, bound for Liverpool, carrying a record number of children and infants. The passengers were anxious. Germany had declared the seas around Britain to be a war zone, and for months, its U-boats had brought terror to the North Atlantic. But the Lusitania was one of the era’s great transatlantic “Greyhounds” and her captain, William Thomas Turner, placed tremendous faith in the gentlemanly strictures of warfare that for a century had kept civilian ships safe from attack. He knew, moreover, that his ship–the fastest then in service–could outrun any threat. Germany, however, was determined to change the rules of the game, and Walther Schwieger, the captain of Unterseeboot-20, was happy to oblige. Meanwhile, an ultra-secret British intelligence unit tracked Schwieger’s U-boat, but told no one. As U-20 and the Lusitania made their way toward Liverpool, an array of forces both grand and achingly small–hubris, a chance fog, a closely guarded secret, and more–all converged to produce one of the great disasters of history.

And that’s all folks. As usual I’m linking in with Sheila at Book Journey for “It’s Monday, What Are You Reading?”.

Emma x

4 comments
  1. I want to read both of those books. Enjoy your day!

    1. Fingers crossed they are good reads. Day was great – thanks for stopping by 😄

  2. Great set of books. I have heard great things about The Bees!

    1. The Bees is the one I started with first. Not sure what I think yet.

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